Description & Overview

Green Mound boxwood is a cold-hardy broadleaf evergreen that is a popular plant for most landscaping uses. Similar to Green Velvet boxwood but with a spherical habit. Growing to about 3 feet tall and wide, Green Mound boxwood is tolerant of full sun or shade and a wide variety of soil types. Green Mound will bronze to some extent in winter, and more so when exposed to direct sunlight. The bronzed leaves bounced back to green when temperatures begin to rise in spring.

Core Characteristics

Category: Broadleaf Evergreen

Wisconsin Native: No - Introduced

USDA Hardiness Zone: to zone 4

Mature Height: 3 feet

Mature Spread: 3 feet

Growth Rate: Moderate

Growth Form: Rounded, Mounded

Light Requirements: Full Sun to Full Shade

Site Requirements: Average to moist, well-drained

Flower: Inconspicuous

Bloom Period: April/Early Spring

Foliage: Medium Green

Fall Color: NA

Urban Approved: Yes

Fruit Notes: Inconspicuous

Suggested Uses

Grow Green Mound boxwood in full sun to full shade; growth will be fastest and fullest in full sun. Boxwood aren’t picky about the type of soil they are grown in; they prefer average to moist conditions in well-draining soil. Boxwood do not do well when planted in areas with heavy salt use or in areas with strong winds, so site carefully or be aware of salt-use.

This cultivar is the perfect size to be used as a foundation planting. Reaching just under typical windowsill heights, Green Mound will not grow to obstruct views. Plant in odd numbers to make the planting aesthetically appealing.

As an evergreen, Green Mound boxwood has a welcomed place in the formal landscape. They take shearing really well, and make excellent low hedges. Border your front yard, front walkway, or driveway for a sophisticated feel.

Green Mounds compact habit makes this an excellent option for edging or bordering beds. It can be the green constant in an abundantly colorful flower bed, the specimen in a low-growing perennial garden, or the punctuation of green that is sometimes needed when flowers are planted in masses.

They can also be planted around decks and patios because it doesn’t have messy fruit, typical leaf drop, or draw in many insects that may be considered pests.

Green Mound boxwood is a cold-hardy broadleaf evergreen that is a popular plant for most landscaping uses. Similar to Green Velvet boxwood but with a …

Wildlife Value

Boxwood has little wildlife value, unfortunately. The tiny, barely noticeable flowers are attractive to bees and flies. Birds can take refuge in their tightly clustered branches.

Maintenance Tips

Pruning or shearing can be performed when there is active growth occurring. Shear using the haircut method.

Boxwood have shallow roots and are more sensitive to soil moisture changes. A healthy mulch layer will help reduce plant stress and retain soil moisture.

Pests/Problems

Black Walnut Tolerant: Yes
Deer Resistant: Yes
Rabbit Resistant: Yes

It’s best to plant boxwood with some space between individual plants. This improves air circulation and create an environment that’s less hospitable for diseases. If possible, avoid overhead irrigation.

Blight, mites, root rot, canker, and leaf spot are all potential pests of boxwood.

Leaf Lore

Despite being poisonous, the leaves of boxwood have historically been used for medicinal purposes. Some of those purposes include being a quinine substitute in the treatment of malaria, in the treatment of syphilis, as a sedative, as a substitute for hops in making beer, and to cure leprosy. Buxus sempervirens Box, Common box, American Boxwood PFAF Plant Database

The common name of boxwood is in reference to its use of the wood to make boxes, but may also have roots in the box-like cross section of the stems of young plants.

Companion Plants

Boxwood are low maintenance and perform well under most conditions. If you are interested in other plants that fulfill similar requirements, try Zagreb Coreopsis (Coreopsis verticillata ‘Zagreb’), Montrose White Calamint (Calamintha nepeta ‘Montrose White’), Dwarf Bush Honeysuckle (Diervilla lonicera), Common Witchhazel (Hamamelis virginiana), American Filbert (Corylus americana), Palace Purple Coral Bells (Heuchera micrantha ‘Palace Purple’), Summer Beauty Allium (Allium ‘Summer Beauty’), Pardon Me Daylily (Hemerocallis ‘Pardon Me’).

Green Mound boxwood is a cold-hardy broadleaf evergreen that is a popular plant for most landscaping uses. Similar to Green Velvet boxwood but with a …
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Written by Beth DeLain