Description & Overview

Haralson apple was introduced in 1922 by the University of Minnesota. This variety produces large, tart apples that are very firm. They are excellent for pies and also for fresh eating for those who prefer eating hard, tart apples. Haralson apples hold their shape well when sliced and cooked in a pie. They do not mush up when cooked so are not great for applesauce but excellent for all other cooked products. Extremely cold hardy variety that stores well.

This plant is no longer in production. The product info remains for informational purposes.

Core Characteristics

Category: Fruit Trees

Wisconsin Native: No

USDA Hardiness Zone: to zone 4

Mature Height: 15 feet

Mature Spread: 15 feet

Growth Rate: Moderate

Growth Form: Tree

Light Requirements: Full Sun

Site Requirements: Well drained site

Flower: White

Bloom Period: Early-mid May

Foliage: Green

Fall Color: Yellow

Urban Approved: Site Specific

Fruit Notes: Striped skin color. Ripens late September in S.E. WI.

Suggested Uses

We offer this variety on M7 rootstock which is semi-dwarf and free-standing.

Haralson apple was introduced in 1922 by the University of Minnesota. This variety produces large, tart apples that are very firm. They are excellent …

Wildlife Value

Apple trees are relished by deer, numerous small mammals, and insects.

Maintenance Tips

Annual pruning is needed to promote better light penetration and air flow thru canopy for best colored and flavored fruits. Find more information on Training & Pruning Fruit Trees.

Haralson apple was introduced in 1922 by the University of Minnesota. This variety produces large, tart apples that are very firm. They are excellent …

Pests/Problems

Less prone to apple scab than other varieties. Apples are prone to many insect and disease issues. Preventative spraying or growing the fruit in bags (organic) is suggested to obtain a quality fruit crop. Find a spraying guide and more information on Best Pesticides For The Home Orchardist.

Leaf Lore

Named in honor of Charles Haralson who worked for the University of Minnesota’s fruit breeding station in the early 20th century. This variety was #1 in popularity in Minnesota for over 50 years until their introduction of Honeycrisp apple.

Companion Plants

Haralson must be cross-pollinated with a crabapple or different apple variety to produce fruit.

Haralson apple was introduced in 1922 by the University of Minnesota. This variety produces large, tart apples that are very firm. They are excellent …
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Written by Paul Schwabe