Description & Overview

New Horizon Elm is a hybrid Elm (Ulmus japonica x Ulmus pumila) with a compact, upright, pyramidal habit and dense canopy. It becomes a broader pyramid as it ages. Inconspicuous, small green flowers appear in early spring before the leaves emerge. Dark green, serrated foliage remains clean throughout the season until turning yellow in fall. The bark develops a gray, ridged texture. This hybrid touts excellent resistance to Dutch Elm Disease, Verticillium Wilt, Elm leaf miners, and black leaf spot.

Core Characteristics

Category: Tree

Wisconsin Native: No - Introduced

USDA Hardiness Zone: to zone 3

Mature Height: 30-40 feet

Mature Spread: 15-25 feet

Growth Rate: Perennial

Growth Form: Broad, compact, pyramidal, upright

Light Requirements: Full Sun

Site Requirements: Moist, well-drained soil

Flower: Inconspicuous, green, small

Bloom Period: Early spring

Foliage: Dark green, 3-4"

Fall Color: Insignificantly yellow

Urban Approved: Yes

Fruit Notes: Samara with wings, mature mid-Spring

Suggested Uses

New Horizon Elm is a great option for new construction housing. It grows quickly, has a nice form and good insect resistance, and will make an instant impact on the landscape. This is also ideal for the homeowner since it will quickly provide shade to the house or living areas.

This cultivar is also able to be planted in city parks for shade and wildlife habitat. It is very tolerant of air and salt pollution, New Horizon can be planted near highways, walkways, in downtown gardens, or lawns by airports. A truly versatile plant!

New Horizon Elm should not be planted underneath power lines.

New Horizon Elm is a hybrid Elm (Ulmus japonica x Ulmus pumila) with a compact, upright, pyramidal habit and dense canopy. It becomes a broader pyrami…
New Horizon Elm is a hybrid Elm (Ulmus japonica x Ulmus pumila) with a compact, upright, pyramidal habit and dense canopy. It becomes a broader pyrami…

Wildlife Value

While information is limited on which insects specifically use Siberian or Japanese elm as a host plant, many insects use Elm as a host plant. Some of these individuals include the Twin-spotted Sphinx (Smerinthus jamaicensis), Elm Sphinx (Ceratomia amyntor), Mysterious Olethreutes Moth (Olethreutes mysteriana), White-lined Sphinx (Hyles lineata), Question Mark (Polygonia interrogationis), Eastern Comma (Polygonia comma), Elm Spanworm Moth (Ennomos subsignaria), Elm LEaftier (Canarsia ulmiarrosorella), Macaria exauspicata, Large Tolype Moth (Tolype velleda), Spiny Looper (Phigalia titea), Tawny Emperor (Asterocampa clyton), White Slant-line (Tetracis cachexiata), Crowned Slug Moth (Isa textula), Smeared Dagger Moth (Acronicta oblinita), Three-lined Leafroller Moth (Pandemis limitata) and the Gold-striped leaftier Moth (Machimia tentoriferella)

Chipmunks, squirrels, Prairie Chickens, Wild Turkeys, pheasants, Chickadees, Purple Finches, Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, and House Sparrows eat the seeds.

Cavities are often formed in tree crotches when a limb has fallen and are used by squirrels, Downy Woodpeckers, starlings, and Hairy Woodpeckers.

Maintenance Tips

Sometimes co-dominant leaders and heavy side branches can develop quickly on this variety, meaning more maintenance may be required. Elms generally grow quickly and reach considerable heights rapidly, often putting the branches out of reach for most homeowners, landscapers, or landowners. Consider safety and contact a certified arborist in your area for pruning needs.

Do not prune between April and October.

This species can reseed aggressively and can become a nuisance in areas that are not easily accessible. It is also susceptible to storm damage and limbs can break.

New Horizon Elm is a hybrid Elm (Ulmus japonica x Ulmus pumila) with a compact, upright, pyramidal habit and dense canopy. It becomes a broader pyrami…

Pests/Problems

Black Walnut Tolerant: Yes
Deer Resistant: No
Rabbit Resistant: No

New Horizon Elm has excellent resistance to Dutch Elm Disease, a fungal disease that causes wilting and yellowing leaves, eventually defoliation.

Elm leaf beetle may feed upon leaves.

This tree has moderate potential of becoming invasive.

Leaf Lore

New Horizon Elm is a hybrid between Siberian Elm (Ulmus pumila) and Japanese Elm (Ulmus davidiana var. japonica) and was introduced into commerce in the mid-1990s. New Horizon is a UW Wisconsin – Madison introduction by the late Professor Eugene Smalley.

It can hybridize with our native slippery (red) elm (Ulmus rubra). Elm tree conservation stayed by hybrid species research – UWMadScience (wisc.edu)

Dutch Elm Disease is a fungus that was introduced around 1930 that was spread by elm bark beetles.

Companion Plants

Plant shade-loving perennials underneath the canopy of New Horizon Elm such as Wild Geranium, Coralbells, Astilbe, Canada Wild Ginger, Spikenard, and Pennsylvania Sedge. Shrubs like Common Witchhazel, American Elderberry, Bladderwort, Silky Dogwood, Sweetshrub, Deutzia, and American Filbert can all be planted nearby and would tolerate all the shade as well.

Other fast-growing shade trees include the London Planetree (Plantanus x acerifolia), American Basswood (Tilia americana), Tuliptree (Liriodendron tulipifera), Northern Catalpa (Catalpa speciosa), Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum), Freeman Maple (Acer x freemanii), Cottonwood (Populus deltoides), Common Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis), Katsura Tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum), and Black Willow (Salix nigra).

New Horizon Elm is a hybrid Elm (Ulmus japonica x Ulmus pumila) with a compact, upright, pyramidal habit and dense canopy. It becomes a broader pyrami…
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Written by Beth DeLain